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COMPLIANCE QUESTION

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Feeg 1 year ago.

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  • #1869

    Mac
    Participant

    Submitted on 2012/07/23 at 6:42 pm

    how many feet from a building does a fuel truck need to be? Also, how many feet away from another vehicle?

    #4055

    Feeg
    Participant

    To be clear Mac, are you referring to a fueling truck?

    #4090

    C Moore
    Participant

    Lets look at this issue. The short answer is what is in your airports AEP (Airport Emergency Plan) or set by Airport Operations for Fueling Operations. Generally as a minimum it is 10 ft between vehicles and 50 ft from building according to FAA 150/5230-4B that references NFPA 407

    NFPA 407 Chapter 5 Aviation Fueling Facilities, 5.1.22
    The authority having jurisdiction shall determine the clearances require from runways, taxiways, and other aircraft movement and servicing areas to any above ground fuel storage structure or fuel transfer equipment (fuel truck or cart), with due recognition given to national and international standards establishing clearances from obstructions.

    The next section to look at is

    NFPA 407 Chapter 6 Airport Fueling Vehicles, 6.2.1.1 Parking of Aircraft Fuel Servicing Tank Vehicles. Parking areas for unattended aircraft tank vehicles shall be arranged to provide the following:
    (1) Dispersal of the vehicles in the event of an emergency
    (2) A minimum of 3 m (10 ft) of clear space between parked vehicles for accessibility for fire control purposes
    (3) Prevention of any leakage from draining to an adjacent building or storm drain that is not suitably designed to handle fuel
    (4) A minimum of 15 m (50 ft) from any parked aircraft and buildings other tan maintenance facilities and garaged for fuel servicing tank vehicles
    6.2.1.2 Parking of Aircraft Fuel Servicing Hydrant Vehicles and Carts. Parking areas for unattended aircraft fuel servicing hydrant vehicles or carts shall be arranged to provide the following:
    (1) Dispersal of the vehicles in the event of an emergency
    (2) PPrevention of any leakage from draining to an adjacent building or storm drain that is not suitably designed to handle fuel

    #4091

    Mac
    Participant

    This is really good information. I followed up with a look at the AC 150/5200-18c and have “book marked” it. Do you know what determines if an airport must use an airport emergency plan? Size?

    #4092

    C Moore
    Participant

    Mac,

    Looking at AC 150/5200-18c, it is dealing with Inspection of airports, including fueling facilities. What is not presented here (until Appendix 3) is any information on parking of fueling equipment. In Appendix 3 on the check sheet lists the distances for spacing between refueling vehicles and the building. This is the only reference to distances for refueling vehicle parking. I would still use ac 150/5230-4b and NFPA 407 as reference and justification when talking to someone about refueling vehicle parking.

    As for an Airport Emergency Plan, it is required as part of an Airport certificate. The FAA requires all airports to develop an Airport Certification Manual (ACM, AC 150/5210-22), which includes among other items, the Airport Emergency Plan (AEP, AC 150/5200-31C). The ACM is what the FAA uses to determine the class of airport, be a General Aviation (GA) or air-carry airport. In the end what should be taken away is that all airports need to regular review their ACM along with their AEP, as thing change over time. Not just the amount of air traffic but who to contact and resources available, during a time of need.

    Another consideration, is that the AEP is only as good as the people who know about it and their expected roll. As part of the regular review, I would suggest that some sort of exercise be performed with the players involved. This can be as simple as a table top exercise to a full scale exercise (as required for Part 139 air-carry airports). For the GA airports, I would reach out to the local emergency responders to develop a level of understanding of what resources and personnel, can be provided for any emergency. This will also provide emergency responders with an understanding of how to operate on the airport.

    #4097

    Mac
    Participant

    Does the FAA require an airport to update the AEP and the ACM annually?

    #4251

    C Moore
    Participant

    The FAA requires that the AEP /ACM to be reviewed annually, and updated with any changes. Most airports I know only update the AEP every 2 to 5 years. As most of the changes are due to vendor contracts, or Airport personnel movement (internal or external). In recent years, airports have stopped printing hard copies and moved to electronic copies. They hold it on a server, that the Airport can then provide access to for the needed parties.

    #4254

    Feeg
    Participant

    Excellent information–thank you very much.

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